Let's face it, when you lift heavy, you've got to massage heavy. Percussion massagers like the TimTAM, Hyperice Hypervolt, and Theragun are all excellent items, but they come with a price tag that runs $350-$600!

Thankfully, with a little ingenuity, around $50 or less, and 15 minutes of work, you can make your own percussion massager and get the myofascial release you need.

How to build the DIY percussion massager of your dreams for $50

Materials needed:

  • Jigsaw (I prefer cordless, try this model- $42 and Amazon Prime shipping- and it comes with one blade). Note- I recommend the model at the link because it is inexpensive, compact, and well-suited to conversion to a massager
  • Jigsaw blade
  • Golf ball (used is fine- grab one somewhere for free, or $9 on Amazon)
  • Epoxy ($6 on Amazon Prime)

Want to buy all the above on Amazon? Here's a list with all materials and tools needed for this project.

Tools needed:

  • Drill and bit
  • File (like this, or with a handle works too)

Materials and tools needed for a DIY percussive massager

Steps:

  1. Blunt the teeth of the jigsaw blade. Insert the blade into the jigsaw. Securely fasten the file (I used a vise). Trigger the jigsaw and "saw" on the file until the teeth of the jigsaw blade file down. This makes the saw safer, in case the golf ball is destroyed.
  2. Drill a hole halfway into the golf ball. Use a drill bit about the same size as the width of the jigsaw blade. Be careful not to slip- I put the golf ball in a vise when I did this
  3. Mix the epoxy and pour it into the hole in the golf ball
  4. Insert the jigsaw blade into the hole in the golf ball. Hammer it tightly in. I did this with the golf ball in the vise, and the jigsaw blade in the jigsaw. I hammered with my hand on the back end of the jigsaw to force the blade into the golf ball
  5. Go away for 24 hours- or however long it takes your epoxy to cure (read the label). I detached the blade from the jigsaw and allowed the epoxy and golf ball to cure in the vise
  6. Come back, attach your new blade/golf ball to the jigsaw, and pound your problem areas to bliss!

Note: In researching this article, I studied a variety of options for building your own DIY massager, and there are a few variations:

  • Many other resources suggest using a combination jigsaw / reciprocating saw. This is a great idea, but most reciprocating saws are large and unwieldy- potentially requiring two people to use when used as a massager. Additionally, a good, compact option plus the correct fitting to convert to a massager push this project to $100 plus- double the cost
  • Some people suggest heating the jigsaw blade with a candle before plunging it into the golf ball. We removed this step as hammering the blade into the golf ball and allowing the epoxy to set fully are sufficient to hold the blade in the ball.

What do you think? Any questions? And if you build your own, please hit us on facebook or instagram with a picture!


Peter Keller
Peter Keller

Author